Coping strategies as mediators of the relations among perceived control and distress in sexual assault survivors

Patricia A Frazier, Heather Mortensen, Jason Steward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

83 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies assessed whether coping strategies mediate the relations among 2 forms of perceived control (past and present control) and postassault distress among female sexual assault survivors. In Study 1, longitudinal data were gathered from 2 weeks to 1 year postassault (N = 171). Past control (behavioral self-blame) was associated with more distress partly because it was associated with greater social withdrawal. Present control (control over the recovery process) was associated with less distress partly because it was associated with less social withdrawal and more cognitive restructuring. In Study 2, cross-sectional data were gathered from a community sample of nonrecent survivors of sexual assault (N = 131). Coping strategies again mediated the relations among the measures of past and present control and distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-278
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005

Keywords

  • Attributions
  • Coping
  • Emotional adjustment
  • Perceived control
  • Sexual assault

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Coping strategies as mediators of the relations among perceived control and distress in sexual assault survivors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this