Coping with stress resulting from social value conflict: Non-Hunters’ response to anticipated social interaction with hunters

Rudy M. Schuster, William E. Hammitt, De Wayne Moore, Ingrid Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research investigated nonhunting-hikers' response to social interactions with hunters in outdoor recreation settings. Hikers were presented with a hypothetical scenario describing a social interaction with hunters. Social value conflict and psychological stress/coping theories were used to hypothesize and test a structural equation model. Fifty-two percent of the sample (n = 388) indicated that the social interaction would be stressful. Hikers appraised the social situation as controllable. The coping response combined emotion and problem-focused coping. This plan included confronting the hunters, expressing personal values, and attempting to dissuade the hunters from continuing to use the area as a hunting ground. Hikers followed perceived rules of etiquette for social interactions and tried not to damage opportunities to continue using the area. Coping responses were consistent with previous models in recreation and psychology. Results are discussed in light of previous research to foster theoretical development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-113
Number of pages13
JournalHuman Dimensions of Wildlife
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Hypothetical scenario
  • Social value conflict
  • Stress
  • Structural equation model

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