Corpus callosum morphology in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder: morphometric analysis of MRI.

G. W. Hynd, M. Semrud-Clikeman, A. R. Lorys, E. S. Novey, D. Eliopulos, H. Lyytinen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

301 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although behavioral evidence provides support for the notion that attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is related to central nervous system dysfunction, there is little direct evidence to reveal which neurometabolic systems or brain structures are involved. Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest that, compared to nondisabled controls, ADHD children may have a smaller right frontal region. Morphometric analysis of MRI scans was used in this exploratory study to determine whether correlated regional variation might exist in the corpus callosum of children with ADHD. While all MRI scans were judged to be clinically normal, morphometric analysis revealed that, compared to nondisabled controls, ADHD children had a smaller corpus callosum, particularly in the region of the genu and splenium, and in the area just anterior to the splenium. Interhemispheric fibers in these regions interconnect the left and right frontal, occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal regions. These results suggest that subtle differences may exist in the brains of children with ADHD and that deviations in normal corticogenesis may underlie the behavioral manifestations of this disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-146
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Learning Disabilities
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1991

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Corpus callosum morphology in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder: morphometric analysis of MRI.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this