Correlates and prevalence of prostatitis in a large community-based cohort of older men

Nicholas A. Daniels, Susan K. Ewing, Joseph M. Zmuda, Timothy J. Wilt, Douglas C. Bauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To describe the prevalence and correlates of self-reported history of prostatitis in terms of lower urinary tract symptoms and associated dissatisfaction in community-dwelling older men. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis from a prospective cohort study of 5821 men aged 65 years and older recruited from six clinical centers. Results. Overall, 1439 men (25%) self-reported a history of prostatitis. Men with a history of prostatitis were more likely to self-report a history of prostate cancer (26% versus 7%; P <0.0001) and a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia (83% versus 38%; P <0.0001) within a lifetime compared with men without a history of prostatitis. Men with a history of prostatitis also had a greater mean American Urological Association symptom score (mean ± SD, 10.1 ± 7.1 versus 7.7 ± 5.9; P <0.0001) than men without a history of prostatitis. Also, a greater percentage of men with a history of prostatitis reported being dissatisfied with their present urinary condition than did men without a history of prostatitis (21% versus 11%; P <0.0001). We found positive associations for a history of prostatitis with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia (odds ratio 8.0, 95% confidence interval 6.8 to 9.5), a history of prostate cancer (odds ratio 5.4, 95% confidence interval 4.4 to 6.6), and dissatisfaction with current urinary condition (odds ratio 1.2, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.5). Conclusions. A self-reported history of prostatitis is common in older men and was associated with self-reported prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia and increased severity of lower urinary tract symptoms and associated dissatisfaction. Because of the potential detection bias, recall bias, and the cross-sectional nature of the study, limiting causal inference, the associations among these urologic conditions require additional study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)964-970
Number of pages7
JournalUrology
Volume66
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project was funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH grants UO1 AG18197-02, UO1 AR45580-02, UO1 AR45614, UO1 AR45632, UO1 AR45647, UO1 AR45654, UO1 AR45583, and M01 RR00334). Dr. Daniels is a recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Minority Medical Faculty Development Award and supported by grant P30-AG15272 under the Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research program funded by the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Nursing Research, and the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, and the Department of Defense Prostate Scholar Award.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Correlates and prevalence of prostatitis in a large community-based cohort of older men'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this