Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete: effects of materials, mix composition, and cracking

Tom Lorentz, Catherine French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper summarizes results from an experimental investigation regarding corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Variables included: condensed silica fume (CSF) content, type and condition of reinforcement coating, effect of air entrainment, and effect of cracking. Test specimens were subjected to an accelerated corrosion-inducing environment for a period of 35 to 48 weeks. Comparisons of specimens with condensed silica fume (CSF) concentration levels of 0, 7.5, or 10 percent indicated the existence of an optimum level of CSF, after which corrosion resistance was not further enhanced. The epoxy-grit coating on undeformed reinforcement performed well in resisting the corrosive environment. Reinforcing steel with intentionally damaged epoxy coatings did not indicate significant levels of corrosion during the experimental period, despite high levels of chloride present in the concrete. No direct relationship between entrained air content and specimen current or resistance values was found. Cracking had a significant effect on corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-190
Number of pages10
JournalACI Materials Journal
Volume92
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 1995

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