Culture, state and revolution

Sonali Pahwa, Jessica Winegar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Arab uprisings have brought major challenges, as well as unprecedented opportunities, to the culture industries. According to a flurry of celebratory news articles from the spring of 2011 onward, protest art is proliferating in the region, from graffiti in Egypt to hip-hop in Morocco to massive photographic displays and political cartoons gone viral in Tunisia. Changes in the cultural scene are not simply a barometer of broader political and economic change, but part and parcel of it, particularly in countries with strong, centralized ministries of culture, such as Egypt, Syria and Tunisia. In these places, the dominant state ideology poses culture as a path to progress and enlightenment. In this moment of opening, cultural producers, intellectuals and politicians are asking foundational questions about the role of government in the field of culture and vice versa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMiddle East Report
Volume42
Issue number263
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Culture, state and revolution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this