DEFINITIONS AND FINDINGS ON INTELLECTUAL 1 In this paper, the term "intellectual disability" (ID) is used in place of "mental retardation" in response to the growing commitments to avoid using the latter term because of the stigma associated with the label. However, when referring to specific items from the NHIS-D, or when referring the historical or legal documents, or to ...

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Abstract

Title full: DEFINITIONS AND FINDINGS ON INTELLECTUAL 1 In this paper, the term "intellectual disability" (ID) is used in place of "mental retardation" in response to the growing commitments to avoid using the latter term because of the stigma associated with the label. However, when referring to specific items from the NHIS-D, or when referring the historical or legal documents, or to previous prevalence studies, the term "mental retardation" is retained for clarity.1 AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES WITHIN THE NHIS-D. This article describes the use of the National Health Interview Survey-Disability Supplement (NHIS-D) to estimate the prevalence and general characteristics of persons with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in the non-institutionalized U.S. population. It provides estimates of the populations of non-institutionalized persons with intellectual disability (defined categorically), with developmental disabilities (defined functionally) and with both. It describes how the prevalence of intellectual and/or developmental disabilities varies by age, poverty status and other demographic variables. It describes how intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities are operationally different, and how the people identified in those groups differ substantially both in number and in demographic characteristics. An analysis of poverty status among adults reveals that poverty is significantly more common for women, people who were not white, people with intellectual or developmental disabilities, adults with less than 12 years of education, and people living with a spouse or alone (as compared to people living with relatives such as parents or siblings).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUsing Survey Data to Study Disability
Subtitle of host publicationResults from the National Health Survey on Disability
Pages229-255
Number of pages27
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Publication series

NameResearch in Social Science and Disability
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1479-3547

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Project funding was provided by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), U.S. Department of Education (Grant No. H133G80082) to the Research and Training Center on Community Living at the University of Minnesota and through the Administration on Developmental Disabilities (Grant No. 90DN0028/01) for the Residential Information Systems Project. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Institute, Center, University, or their funding sources.

Copyright:
Copyright 2007 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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