Development of Conceptual Models to Guide Public Health Research, Practice, and Policy: Synthesizing Traditional and Contemporary Paradigms

Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This applied paper is intended to serve as a “how to” guide for public health researchers, practitioners, and policy makers who are interested in building conceptual models to convey their ideas to diverse audiences. Conceptual models can provide a visual representation of specific research questions. They also can show key components of programs, practices, and policies designed to promote health. Conceptual models may provide improved guidance for prevention and intervention efforts if they are based on frameworks that integrate social ecological and biological influences on health and incorporate health equity and social justice principles. To enhance understanding and utilization of this guide, we provide examples of conceptual models developed by the Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium. PLUS is a transdisciplinary U.S. scientific network established by the National Institutes of Health in 2015 to promote bladder health and prevent lower urinary tract symptoms, an emerging public health and prevention priority. The PLUS Research Consortium is developing conceptual models to guide its prevention research agenda. Research findings may in turn influence future public health practices and policies. This guide can assist others in framing diverse public health and prevention science issues in innovative, potentially transformative ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)510-524
Number of pages15
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors acknowledge special contributions to featured conceptual models by the following PLUS Research Consortium members: Amanda Berry, Neill Epperson, Colleen Fitzgerald, Missy Lavender, Ariana Smith, and Beverly Williams. The authors also acknowledge the foundational work of Jo Anne Earp, Professor Emerita, and Susan T. Ennett, Professor, Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Earp and Dr. Ennett?s pioneering ?how to? guide for building conceptual models, published in 1991, inspired the present guide. In addition, the authors acknowledge Kenneth L. McLeroy, Professor Emeritus and retired Regents and Distinguished Professor, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, for helpful discussion about manuscript content. Linda Brubaker currently receives editorial stipends from JAMA (Associate Editor), Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (Editor-in-Chief), and UpToDate (Section Editor). Cynthia S. Fok receives author royalties from UpToDate. Cora E. Lewis received grant support from Novo Nordisk (a pharmaceutical company that manufactures drugs to treat these conditions) for clinical trials in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Ann Stapleton previously served on advisory boards related to urinary tract infection, GSK and Paratek. The remaining authors do not have any conflict of interest to disclose. This work of the Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through cooperative agreements (Grant Numbers U01DK106786, U01DK106853, U01DK106858, U01D K106898, U01DK106893, U01DK106827, U01DK106908, U01DK 106892). Additional support was provided by the National Institute on Aging, NIH Office of Research on Women?s Health, and NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIH.

Funding Information:
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8660-9308 Brady Sonya S. PhD 1 Brubaker Linda MD, MS 2 Fok Cynthia S. MD, MPH 1 Gahagan Sheila MD, MPH 2 Lewis Cora E. MD, MSPH 3 Lewis Jessica PhD, MFT 4 Lowder Jerry L. MD, MSc 5 Nodora Jesse DrPH 2 Stapleton Ann MD 6 Palmer Mary H. PhD 7 Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium 1 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA 2 University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA 3 University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA 4 Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA 5 Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA 6 University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA 7 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Mueller Elizabeth Fitzgerald Colleen M. Hardacker Cecilia T. Hebert-Beirne Jeni Lavender Missy Shoham David A. Burgio Kathryn Markland Alayne McGwin Gerald Williams Beverly Lukacz Emily S. LaCoursiere D. Yvette Nodora Jesse N. Miller Janis M. An Lawrence Chin-I Low Lisa Kane Newman Diane Kaschak Berry Amanda Epperson C. Neill Schmitz Kathryn H. Smith Ariana L. Wyman Jean Sutcliffe Siobhan McNicholas Colleen James Aimee Lowder Jerry Rickey Leslie Camenga Deepa Cunningham Shayna D. Chai Toby Lewis Jessica B. Harlow Bernard Rudser Kyle Connett John Chu Haitao Fok Cynthia Rockwood Todd Constantine Melissa Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium Sonya S. Brady, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, 1300 South Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA; e-mail: ssbrady@umn.edu . 1 2020 1524839919890869 © 2020 Society for Public Health Education 2020 Society for Public Health Education This applied paper is intended to serve as a “how to” guide for public health researchers, practitioners, and policy makers who are interested in building conceptual models to convey their ideas to diverse audiences. Conceptual models can provide a visual representation of specific research questions. They also can show key components of programs, practices, and policies designed to promote health. Conceptual models may provide improved guidance for prevention and intervention efforts if they are based on frameworks that integrate social ecological and biological influences on health and incorporate health equity and social justice principles. To enhance understanding and utilization of this guide, we provide examples of conceptual models developed by the P revention of L ower U rinary Tract S ymptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium. PLUS is a transdisciplinary U.S. scientific network established by the National Institutes of Health in 2015 to promote bladder health and prevent lower urinary tract symptoms, an emerging public health and prevention priority. The PLUS Research Consortium is developing conceptual models to guide its prevention research agenda. Research findings may in turn influence future public health practices and policies. This guide can assist others in framing diverse public health and prevention science issues in innovative, potentially transformative ways. conceptual model conceptual framework theory social ecology lower urinary tract symptoms bladder health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106786 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106827 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106853 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106858 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106892 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106893 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106898 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases https://doi.org/10.13039/100000062 U01DK106908 National Institute on Aging https://doi.org/10.13039/100000049 Office of Research on Women’s Health https://doi.org/10.13039/100000124 Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research https://doi.org/10.13039/100000118 edited-state corrected-proof typesetter ts1 The authors acknowledge special contributions to featured conceptual models by the following PLUS Research Consortium members: Amanda Berry, Neill Epperson, Colleen Fitzgerald, Missy Lavender, Ariana Smith, and Beverly Williams. The authors also acknowledge the foundational work of Jo Anne Earp, Professor Emerita, and Susan T. Ennett, Professor, Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Earp and Dr. Ennett’s pioneering “how to” guide for building conceptual models, published in 1991, inspired the present guide. In addition, the authors acknowledge Kenneth L. McLeroy, Professor Emeritus and retired Regents and Distinguished Professor, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, for helpful discussion about manuscript content. Linda Brubaker currently receives editorial stipends from JAMA (Associate Editor), Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (Editor-in-Chief), and UpToDate (Section Editor). Cynthia S. Fok receives author royalties from UpToDate. Cora E. Lewis received grant support from Novo Nordisk (a pharmaceutical company that manufactures drugs to treat these conditions) for clinical trials in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Ann Stapleton previously served on advisory boards related to urinary tract infection, GSK and Paratek. The remaining authors do not have any conflict of interest to disclose. This work of the Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through cooperative agreements (Grant Numbers U01DK106786, U01DK106853, U01DK106858, U01D K106898, U01DK106893, U01DK106827, U01DK106908, U01DK 106892). Additional support was provided by the National Institute on Aging, NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health, and NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIH. Participating PLUS research centers at the time of this writing are as follows: Loyola University Chicago - 2160 S. 1 st Avenue, Maywood, Il 60153-3328 Linda Brubaker, MD, MS, Multi-PI; Elizabeth Mueller, MD, MSME, Multi-PI; Colleen M. Fitzgerald, MD, MS, Investigator; Cecilia T. Hardacker, RN, MSN, Investigator; Jeni Hebert-Beirne, PhD, MPH, Investigator; Missy Lavender, MBA, Investigator; David A. Shoham, PhD, Investigator University of Alabama at Birmingham - 1720 2nd Ave South, Birmingham, AL 35294 Kathryn Burgio, PhD, PI; Cora E. Lewis, MD, MSPH, Investigator; Alayne Markland, DO, MSc, Investigator; Gerald McGwin, PhD, Investigator; Beverly Williams, PhD, Investigator University of California San Diego - 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0021 Emily S. Lukacz, MD, PI; Sheila Gahagan, MD, MPH, Investigator; D. Yvette LaCoursiere, MD, MPH, Investigator; Jesse N. Nodora, DrPH, Investigator University of Michigan - 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Janis M. Miller, PhD, MSN, PI; Lawrence Chin-I An, MD, Investigator; Lisa Kane Low, PhD, MS, CNM, Investigator University of Pennsylvania – Urology, 3rd FL West, Perelman Bldg, 34th & Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 Diane Kaschak Newman, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN PI; Amanda Berry, PhD, CRNP, Investigator; C. Neill Epperson, MD, Investigator; Kathryn H. Schmitz, PhD, MPH, FACSM, FTOS, Investigator; Ariana L. Smith, MD, Investigator; Ann Stapleton, MD, FIDSA, FACP, Investigator; Jean Wyman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Investigator Washington University in St. Louis - One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 Siobhan Sutcliffe, PhD, PI; Colleen McNicholas, DO, MSc, Investigator; Aimee James, PhD, MPH, Investigator; Jerry Lowder, MD, MSc, Investigator Yale University - PO Box 208058 New Haven, CT 06520-8058 Leslie Rickey, MD, PI; Deepa Camenga, MD, MHS, Investigator; Shayna D. Cunningham, PhD, Investigator; Toby Chai, MD, Investigator; Jessica B. Lewis, PhD, MFT, Investigator Steering Committee Chair: Mary H. Palmer, PhD, RN: University of North Carolina NIH Program Office: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases, Bethesda, MD NIH Project Scientist: Tamara Bavendam MD, MS; Project Officer: Ziya Kirkali, MD; Scientific Advisors: Chris Mullins, PhD and Jenna Norton, MPH Scientific and Data Coordinating Center (SDCC): University of Minnesota - 3 Morrill Hall, 100 Church St. S.E., Minneapolis MN 55455 Bernard Harlow, PhD, Multi-PI; Kyle Rudser, PhD, Multi-PI; Sonya S. Brady, PhD, Investigator; John Connett, PhD, Investigator; Haitao Chu, MD, PhD, Investigator; Cynthia Fok, MD, MPH, Investigator; Todd Rockwood, PhD, Investigator; Melissa Constantine, PhD, MPAff, Investigator ORCID iD Sonya S. Brady https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8660-9308

Keywords

  • bladder health
  • conceptual framework
  • conceptual model
  • lower urinary tract symptoms
  • social ecology
  • theory

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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