Dietary intake of soy and cruciferous vegetables and treatment-related symptoms in Chinese-American and non-Hispanic White breast cancer survivors

Sarah J.O. Nomura, Yi Ting Hwang, Scarlett Lin Gomez, Teresa T. Fung, Shu Lan Yeh, Chiranjeev Dash, Laura Allen, Serena Philips, Leena Hilakivi-Clarke, Yun Ling Zheng, Judy Huei yu Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This project was undertaken to examine the association between dietary intake of soy or cruciferous vegetables and breast cancer treatment-related symptoms among Chinese-American (CA) and Non-Hispanic White (NHW) breast cancer survivors. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 192 CA and 173 NHW female breast cancer survivors (stages 0–III, diagnosed between 2006 and 2012) recruited from two California cancer registries, who had completed primary treatment. Patient-reported data on treatment-related symptoms and potential covariates were collected via telephone interviews. Dietary data were ascertained by mailed questionnaires. The outcomes evaluated were menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, vaginal discharge), joint problems, fatigue, hair thinning/loss, and memory problems. Associations between soy and cruciferous vegetables and symptoms were assessed using logistic regression. Analyses were further stratified by race/ethnicity and endocrine therapy usage (non-user, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors). Results: Soy food and cruciferous vegetable intake ranged from no intake to 431 and 865 g/day, respectively, and was higher in CA survivors. Higher soy food intake was associated with lower odds of menopausal symptoms (≥ 24.0 vs. 0 g/day, OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.25, 1.03), and fatigue (≥ 24.0 vs. 0 g/day, OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.22, 0.84). However, when stratified by race/ethnicity, associations were statistically significant in NHW survivors only. Compared with low intake, higher cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with lower odds of experiencing menopausal symptoms (≥ 70.8 vs. OpenSPiltSPi 33.0 g/day, OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.25, 0.97) in the overall population. Conclusions: In this population of breast cancer survivors, higher soy and cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with less treatment-related menopausal symptoms and fatigue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-479
Number of pages13
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume168
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a Lance Armstrong Foundation Young Investigator Award and a National Cancer Institute R21 Grant# CA139408. The collection of cancer incidence data used in this study was supported by the California Department of Public Health as part of the statewide cancer reporting program mandated by California Health and Safety Code Section?103885; the National Cancer Institute?s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program under contract HHSN261201000140C awarded to the Cancer Prevention Institute of California, contract HHSN261201000035C awarded to the University of Southern California, and contract HHSN261201000034C awarded to the Public Health Institute; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention?s National Program of Cancer Registries, under agreement # U58DP003862-01 awarded to the California Department of Public Health. The ideas and opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s). Endorsement by the State of California Department of Public Health, the National Cancer Institute, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or their Contractors and Subcontractors is not intended nor should be inferred. The project described was supported by the Award Number R21CA139408 from the National Cancer Institute and Lance Armstrong Foundation Young Investigator Award. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies including National Cancer Institute or the National Institutes of Health. A correction to this article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-017-4634-5.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Copyright:
Copyright 2019 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Breast cancer survivors
  • Cruciferous vegetables
  • Endocrine therapy
  • Late treatment effects
  • Soy foods

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