Dietary patterns and associations with BMI in low-income, ethnic minority youth in the USA according to baseline data from four randomised controlled trials

Madison N. Lecroy, Holly L. Nicastro, Kimberly P. Truesdale, Donna M. Matheson, Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Charlotte A. Pratt, Sarah Jones, Nancy E. Sherwood, Laura E. Burgess, Thomas N. Robinson, Song Yang, June Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Few studies have derived data-driven dietary patterns in youth in the USA. This study examined data-driven dietary patterns and their associations with BMI measures in predominantly low-income, racial/ethnic minority US youth. Data were from baseline assessments of the four Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Research (COPTR) Consortium trials: NET-Works (534 2-4-year-olds), GROW (610 3-5-year-olds), GOALS (241 7-11-year-olds) and IMPACT (360 10-13-year-olds). Weight and height were measured. Children/adult proxies completed three 24-h dietary recalls. Dietary patterns were derived for each site from twenty-four food/beverage groups using k-means cluster analysis. Multivariable linear regression models examined associations of dietary patterns with BMI and percentage of the 95th BMI percentile. Healthy (produce and whole grains) and Unhealthy (fried food, savoury snacks and desserts) patterns were found in NET-Works and GROW. GROW additionally had a dairy-and sugar-sweetened beverage-based pattern. GOALS had a similar Healthy pattern and a pattern resembling a traditional Mexican diet. Associations between dietary patterns and BMI were only observed in IMPACT. In IMPACT, youth in the Sandwich (cold cuts, refined grains, cheese and miscellaneous) compared with Mixed (whole grains and desserts) cluster had significantly higher BMI (β = 0·99 (95 % CI 0·01, 1·97)) and percentage of the 95th BMI percentile (β = 4·17 (95 % CI 0·11, 8·24)). Healthy and Unhealthy patterns were the most common dietary patterns in COPTR youth, but diets may differ according to age, race/ethnicity or geographic location. Public health messages focused on healthy dietary substitutions may help youth mimic a dietary pattern associated with lower BMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-91
Number of pages11
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume126
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 14 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by grants U01 HL103561, U01 HL103620, U01 HL103622, U01 HL103629, U01 HD068890, UL 1RR024989 and NIH DK56350 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. The content expressed in this paper is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health or the US Department of Health and Human Services. The National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Health and Human Services had no role in the design, analysis or writing of this article. Support for MNL was provided by a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute training grant (T32 HL144456).

Publisher Copyright:
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Keywords

  • BMI
  • Cluster analysis
  • Dietary patterns
  • Ethnic minorities
  • Youth

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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