Differences in Cervical Cancer Screening Between African-American Versus African-Born Black Women in the United States

Alison Forney-Gorman, Katy B. Kozhimannil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although the incidence of cervical cancer has been declining steadily since the Pap smear became standard of care in the U.S., many African immigrants are unfamiliar with this screening test and its potential benefits. Using data from the CDC’s National Health Interview Surveys, we identified respondents who were black women living in the United States, distinguishing U.S.-born (n = 620) and African-born (n = 36). We constructed a measure of current Pap status and used multivariate logistic regression models to compare Pap status between the two groups. Controlling for income, age, education, health insurance, and marital status, African American women were over 3 times more likely to have reported a current Pap smear than African-born women [Adjusted OR = 3.37, 95 % CI = (1.89, 5.96)]. Being an African-born woman was the strongest predictor of current Pap status. Distinguishing immigrant status in an analysis of cervical cancer screening rates for black women indicated much lower Pap smear rates for African-born women, compared with African-American women. More research on the impact of education and culturally specific care is needed to address the disparity in Pap smear rates for African-born black women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1371-1377
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • African
  • African-American
  • Cervical cancer
  • Disparities
  • Immigrant
  • Pap smear

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