Discovery of Hidden Profiles by Decision-Making Groups: Solving a Problem Versus Making a Judgment

Garold Stasser, Dennis Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

417 Scopus citations

Abstract

An information-sampling model proposed by Stasser and Titus (1985, 1987) and observations of discussion content (Stasser, Taylor, & Hanna, 1989) suggest that face-to-face discussions often fail to disseminate unshared information. However, groups may be less prone to overlooking unshared information if they believe that their task has a demonstrably correct answer (Laughlin, 1980). University students read a murder mystery and then met in groups to discuss the case. Groups believed they had either sufficient (solve set) or insufficient (judge set) evidence to determine the guilty suspect. When critical clues were unshared before discussion, 67% of solve, but only 35% of judge, groups identified the guilty suspect. Discussion content analyses showed that solve groups focused more on the critical clues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-434
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1992
Externally publishedYes

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