Discriminant function analysis of depressive symptoms in binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, and major depression

Scott J Crow, Kay M. Zander, Ross D. Crosby, James E. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the frequency and distribution of depressive symptoms among subjects with binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and major depression. Methods: This study examined depressive symptoms from the Hamilton Depression Scale in 122 BED, 142 BN, and 200 major depression subjects using discriminant function analysis. Results: All three groups differed significantly on the Hamilton Depression Scale totals with major depressive disorder (MDD) subjects having the highest and BED subjects the lowest totals. Eighteen items differentiated MDD from the eating disorder groups. Three items-gastrointestinal (GI) somatic symptoms, paranoid symptoms, and obsessional symptoms-distinguished BED and BN. In each case these symptoms were more common in BN subjects. Discussion: This study attempted to differentiate BN from BED on a basis other than eating behavior. The results provide limited support for the hypothesis that BN and BED can be distinguished on the basis of depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-404
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 1996

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