Do girls pay an unequal price? Black and Latina girls' math attitudes, math anxiety, and mathematics achievement

Saskias Casanova, Rose K. Vukovic, Michael J. Kieffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the longitudinal relation between math attitudes and math anxiety in first grade (Mage = 6 years, 10 months) and mathematics achievement in fourth grade (Mage = 9 years, 11 months) for 155 Black and Latinx children. Multi-group structural equation modeling showed an inverse relation between math attitudes and math anxiety in first grade for boys and girls. Although there were no mean differences in math anxiety between boys and girls, there was a significant difference in its longitudinal relation with mathematics achievement: for girls, but not boys, first grade math anxiety negatively predicted fourth grade mathematics achievement, controlling for earlier achievement. Math anxiety longitudinally contributes to minoritized girls' long-term mathematics achievement. Teachers should be knowledgeable about the relation between math anxiety and math attitudes and be more responsive to Black and Latinx girls' mathematical learning needs to provide them equitable opportunities to be successful in mathematics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101256
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume73
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Black
  • Gender
  • Latinx
  • Math anxiety
  • Math attitudes
  • Mathematics achievement

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