Do preschool special education services make a difference in kindergarten reading and mathematics skills? A propensity score weighting analysis

Amanda L. Sullivan, Samuel Field

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the average treatment effect of preschool special education services on children's kindergarten academic skills. Using data from a nationally representative sample of United States children who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, we examined the effectiveness of preschool special education services by comparing reading and math outcomes for children who received special education services at preschool-age to a propensity-score-weighted sample of children who did not receive these services. Results indicated that the receipt of these special education services had a statistically significant moderate negative effect on children's kindergarten skills in both reading (d= - 0.21) and mathematics (d= - 0.29). These findings have implications for the implementation and evaluation of services for young children experiencing developmental delays or disabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-260
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of school psychology
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported in part by a grant from the American Educational Research Association and a fellowship from the National Center for Research in Early Childhood Education.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Early intervention
  • Effectiveness
  • Preschool
  • Propensity score weighting
  • Special education

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