Does the engaged public's evaluation of networking practices matter? The effects of polarized attitudes and the reputation of networking on individuals' word-of-mouth behaviors

Jisu Kim, Keonyoung Park, Hyejoon Rim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study examines the influence of individuals' attitudes and the perceived organization's ability to network with its stakeholders on their positive and negative word-of-mouth (WOM) behaviors. The study also examines how these relationships differ between the general and engaged public, taking the organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) as a case study. The results show that individuals' attitudes toward PETA predict positive and negative WOM behaviors regardless of their previous engagement in PETA. Yet the influence of the perceived reputation of PETA's networking with other stakeholders on positive or negative WOM behaviors displayed different patterns between the general and the engaged public. For the engaged public, the idea that PETA has a good relationship with its members is considered more important than outreach to nonsupporters. In addition, how individuals perceive characteristics of stakeholders or their influence on organizations influences the relationship between the perceived reputation of networking and the engaged public's negative WOM behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1624
JournalInternational Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

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