Draft genome sequences of concurrent Escherichia coli blood and fecal isolates from a patient with bacteremia and diarrhea belie BioFire-based detection of fecal enteropathogenic E. coli

Pradip Kumar Singh, Brian D. Johnston, James R. Johnson, Michael S. Donnenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The BioFire FilmArray® Gastrointestinal panel is a multiplex PCR assay widely used to determine the etiology of infectious gastroenteritis directly from stool specimens. Recently a positive BioFire result for fecal enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) was reported by a clinical microbiology laboratory for an adult patient with diarrhea and bacteremia. Since EPEC infrequently infects adults and rarely causes bacteremia, we isolated fecal E. coli and characterized the patient's blood and fecal E. coli isolates. Draft genome sequencing using a combination of methods indicated that the blood and fecal strains are virtually identical, are from sequence type 963 (phylogroup D) and exhibit neither the virulence genes characteristic of EPEC and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) nor classic EPEC-associated phenotypes. These findings support a gut source for the patient's bacteremia but exclude EPEC as the causative organism, and suggest that results of multiplex PCR assays from complex samples can be misleading, and should be interpreted with caution when they are discordant with clinical information. BioProject accession numbers for strains MVAST5574 and MVAST5635 genomes are PRJNA611789 and PRJNA611804, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberftaa058
JournalPathogens and Disease
Volume78
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS.

Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • Diagnosis
  • Diarrhea
  • EPEC
  • MLST
  • Multiplex PCR
  • Next generation sequencing

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