Early Self-Knowledge and Emotional Development: Visual Self-Recognition and Affective Reactions to Mirror Self-Images in Maltreated and Non-Maltreated Toddlers

Karen Schneider-Rosen, Dante Cicchetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the association among child maltreatment, socioeconomic status (SES), visual self-recognition, and emotional responses to mirror images. Children were assessed cross-sectionally at 18, 24, and 30 months. The nonmaltreated children spanned two SES groups (lower and middle), and the maltreated children came from the lower SES. Maltreated children did not differ from the lower- or middle-SES comparison children in the development of visual self-recognition. Differences between the samples were observed in the quality of affective reactions to mirror self-images. Hierarchical loglinear modeling was used to test for associations among the variables of self-recognition, age, SES, maltreatment, and affective reactions to mirror images (positive, negative, and neutral, as well as coy affective responses). Results are discussed in terms of the complex interactions among these variables, indicating that the ontogenesis of self-knowledge is determined by multiple interrelated influences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-478
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1991
Externally publishedYes

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