Economic informality and the venture funding impact of migrant remittances to developing countries

Candace Martinez, Michael E. Cummings, Paul M. Vaaler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

In developing countries, weak institutional capacity to observe and regulate the economy discourages foreign capital inflows vital to venture investment. This informality effect may differ for migrant remittances, inflows less reliant on formal arrangements. We use institutional and transaction cost theories to propose that informality shifts migrant remittances toward venture funding. Analyses in 48 developing countries observed from 2001 to 2009 support our proposition. When the informal sector exceeds approximately 46% of GDP, remittances increase venture funding availability. Migrants and their remittances are vital to funding new businesses and entrepreneurially-led economic growth in developing countries where substantial informality deters other foreign investors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-545
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Business Venturing
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Keywords

  • Entrepreneurship
  • Informal economy
  • Migrants
  • Remittances
  • Venture funding availability

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