Effect of combination antiretroviral therapy on T-cell immunity in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

Uma Malhotra, M. Michelle Berrey, Yijian Huang, Janan Markee, Darin J. Brown, Sophe Ap, Luwy Musey, Timothy Schacker, Lawrence Corey, M. Juliana McElrath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

142 Scopus citations

Abstract

T-cell responses were evaluated prospectively in 41 patients with acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection (30 untreated and 11 receiving zidovudine, lamivudine, and indinavir) and in 38 uninfected adults. By 6-12 months, treated patients had significantly greater median Candida and tetanus lymphoproliferative responses (stimulation index [SI], 76 and 55, respectively) than did untreated patients (SI, 7 and 6, P = .02 and .001, respectively), and the responses of treated patients surpassed those of uninfected adults (SI, 19 and 32, P = .002 and .101, respectively). Unlike the patients in the untreated group, the patients in the treated group mounted a 6-fold increased HIV-1 p24 response (SI increase, 1.0 to 5.7, P = .01) within 3 months. HIV-1-specific cytotoxicity remained detectable in most treated patients. Thus, combination therapy administered within 3-4 months of infection was associated with improved T-cell memory responses that were distinct from those of untreated patients. The amplified HIV-1-specific T- cell responses may help maintain cytotoxic activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-131
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume181
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Grant support: National Institutes of Health (AI45206, AI01550, AI38858, and AI41535).

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