Effect of naloxone on intake of cornstarch, sucrose, and polycose diets in restricted and nonrestricted rats

Derik T. Weldon, Eugene O'Hare, James Cleary, Charles J. Billington, Allen S. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied the effect of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone on intake of three isocaleric diets containing cornstarch, sucrose, or Polycose as the predominant carbohydrate in ad libitum-fed and food-restricted rats. A large body of evidence suggests that opioids affect palatability (reward)rather than hunger (energy deficit)-driven food intake. We expected food intake to be driven by both energy needs and palatability in ad libitum- fed rats, whereas in food-restricted rats we expected intake to be driven by energy needs with a relatively small palatability component in the preferred sucrose and Polycose diet groups. In the ad libitum-fed rats, naloxone significantly reduced nocturnal intake of all three diets at doses of 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg. In contrast, naloxone failed to alter intake of the cornstarch diet in chronically food-restricted rats. However, naloxone decreased intake of the sucrose diet in food-restricted rats at doses of 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg and decreased intake of the Polycose diet at the 3 mg/kg dose. These data lend further support to the notion that opioids are involved in some other component of feeding than that induced by energy needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R1183-R1188
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume270
Issue number6 39-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • carbohydrate
  • food deprivation
  • food intake
  • food restriction
  • palatability

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