Effects of age, sex, reproductive status, and hospitalization on serum alpha 1-antitrypsin concentration in dogs.

D. Hughes, D. A. Elliott, R. J. Washabau, F. Kueppers

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

We performed a study to determine a reference range for serum alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) in dogs by specific immunoassay; to evaluate whether serum alpha 1AT concentration varied with age, sex, or reproductive status in healthy dogs; and to investigate whether the serum alpha 1AT concentration in hospitalized dogs differed from that of healthy, nonhospitalized dogs. Serum alpha 1AT was quantitated by radial gel immuno-diffusion for 60 healthy dogs and 311 hospitalized dogs. In healthy dogs, serum alpha 1AT concentration was 2.33 +/- 0.41 mg/ml (mean +/- SD), yielding a reference range (mean +/- 2 SD) of 1.51 to 3.15 mg/ml. A correlation was not found between serum alpha 1AT concentration and age in healthy dogs. The serum alpha 1AT concentration (mean +/- SEM mg/ml) was significantly higher in healthy, sexually intact females (2.64 +/- 0.1) than in healthy, spayed females (2.22 +/- 0.12; P < 0.004); healthy, sexually intact males (2.14 +/- 0.1; P < 0.0006); and healthy, and castrated males (2.25 +/- 0.14; P < 0.02). Hospitalized, sexually intact females had a lower serum alpha 1AT concentration (1.93 +/- 0.07) than healthy, sexually intact females (2.64 +/- 0.1; P < 0.0002). Likewise, the serum alpha 1AT concentration in hospitalized, sexually intact males (1.92 +/- 0.04) was less than in healthy, sexually intact males (2.14 +/- 0.1; P < 0.04). A difference in alpha 1AT concentration was not found between healthy and hospitalized, neutered dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-572
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume56
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1995

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