Effects of anionic supplement source in prepartum negative dietary cation-anion difference diets on serum calcium, feed intake, and lactational performance of multiparous dairy cows

Luciano S. Caixeta, Wanda J. Weber, Danielle M. Johnson, Jill Faser, Barry M. Visser, Brian A. Crooker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Incidence of subclinical hypocalcemia in early postpartum dairy cows continues to be an animal welfare concern and an economic burden for producers. Feeding prepartum negative dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) diets produces metabolic acidosis, which supports mobilization of bone calcium and reduces the incidence of hypocalcemia. Achieving a sufficient degree of metabolic acidosis without reducing dry matter intake (DMI) can be difficult. This study compared the ability of MegAnion (MA; Origination O2D Inc., Maplewood, MN), a new DCAD supplement designed to be more palatable than typical anionic salt sources, and another palatable commercial DCAD product, SoyChlor (SC; Landus Cooperative, Ralston, IA), to reduce urine pH (a surrogate for metabolic acidosis) without reducing prepartum DMI. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of these anionic supplements on postpartum serum calcium concentrations and DMI. Prepartum multiparous Holstein (HO) and crossbred (XX) cows were blocked by breed and expected calving date and randomly assigned within breed to total mixed rations (TMR) with MA or SC and DCAD values of −215 mEq/kg of DM. Cows (n = 56; 15 MA-HO, 12 SC-HO, 15 MA-XX, 14 SC-XX) consumed the treatment TMR for at least 19 d and completed the 28 d in milk (DIM) phase of the study. Urine and blood samples were collected weekly and at 1, 2, and 3 DIM. Data were analyzed as a randomized block design by repeated measures with week or DIM as the repeated effect. Prepartum urine pH decreased from 8.15 ± 0.27 before treatment to 6.12 ± 0.14 during treatment, was not affected by anionic supplement, and increased immediately after calving when all cows consumed the same early-lactation TMR. Prepartum serum calcium concentrations were not affected (2.34 vs. 2.33 ± 0.02 mmol/L) by treatment, whereas nonesterified fatty acids were lower (86 vs. 120 ± 10 mmol/L) and insulin was greater (215 vs. 174 ± 10 pmol/L) in cows fed MA than in cows fed SC. These differences are supported by the numerically greater prepartum DMI (1.2 kg/d) and energy balance (1.8 Mcal/d) of cows fed MA. However, pre- and postpartum DMI and other production variables, including body weight, body condition score, milk yield, and energy balance, were not affected by treatment. This lack of difference indicates that MA provides another effective source of anionic salts for diets designed to reduce urine pH and induce metabolic acidosis in prepartum dairy cows.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4302-4314
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume103
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station (St. Paul). The authors also acknowledge and thank Origination O2D Inc. (Maplewood, MN) for partial financial support of this project. J. Faser was employed by Origination O2D Inc. and B. Visser was employed by Vita Plus Corporation (Madison, WI) when this study was conducted. These coauthors helped develop the study and reviewed the manuscript but were not involved with any of the data analyses. Fei Sun from Origination O2D Inc. also provided review comments. All other authors have no conflicts to declare. The authors appreciate the excellent animal care and courteous assistance provided throughout the study by Saige Sulzberger and the staff at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul campus dairy. We also acknowledge and appreciate the valuable health care provided by Bobwealth Omontese (University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, St. Paul) and his assistance with sample collection.

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station (St. Paul). The authors also acknowledge and thank Origination O2D Inc. (Maplewood, MN) for partial financial support of this project. J. Faser was employed by Origination O2D Inc. and B. Visser was employed by Vita Plus Corporation (Madison, WI) when this study was conducted. These coauthors helped develop the study and reviewed the manuscript but were not involved with any of the data analyses. Fei Sun from Origination O2D Inc. also provided review comments. All other authors have no conflicts to declare. The authors appreciate the excellent animal care and courteous assistance provided throughout the study by Saige Sulzberger and the staff at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul campus dairy. We also acknowledge and appreciate the valuable health care provided by Bobwealth Omontese (University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, St. Paul) and his assistance with sample collection.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 American Dairy Science Association

Keywords

  • anionic salt
  • dietary cation-anion difference diet
  • subclinical hypocalcemia
  • urine pH

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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