Effects of live music on satisfaction of students waiting for treatment in a university health clinic

Michael J Silverman, Gary Alan Hue Christenson, David Golden, Jenna Chaput-McGovern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of live music in the waiting room of a university clinic utilizing a quasi-experimental design. Patients in the waiting room tended to give higher positive satisfaction ratings after the music condition (n = 52) than the no music control condition (n = 14). There were significant between-group differences concerning participants' satisfaction with check-in (p < .001) and if the participants would recommend this clinic to their family or friends (p < .03), with the experimental group having higher ratings. Staff working at the check-in desk also had positive perceptions and ratings of the live music condition and noted it did not interfere with their ability to conduct their job duties or ability to protect patient confidentiality. Performing students had a high degree of enjoyment providing live music at a university health clinic waiting room. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of live music in a university clinic waiting room and may be applicable for music therapists who supervise volunteer musicians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-48
Number of pages6
JournalMusic Therapy Perspectives
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of live music on satisfaction of students waiting for treatment in a university health clinic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this