Effects of policies to restrict malt liquor sales on neighborhood crime

Elizabeth Barajas, Patricia McKee, Peter J. Hannan, Toben F. Nelson, Rhonda Jones-Webb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the effectiveness of malt liquor sales restrictions adopted in 2005 in three liquor stores in a large Midwestern U.S. city. We hypothesized that the restrictions would be associated with crime reductions in adjacent neighborhoods. Using Poisson regression modeling, we compared crime rates two years prior to, and two years following policy adoption. Findings were mixed; malt liquor restrictions were associated with reductions in disorderly conduct citations, but increases in larceny/theft, beyond citywide trends. Limitations and implications of our study are discussed, and further research suggested. The study was funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1234-1243
Number of pages10
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume46
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded by a grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Address correspondence to Rhonda Jones-Webb, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 S. 2nd Street, Minneapolis, MN 55454-1015, USA; E-mail: jones010@umn.edu.

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Beer
  • Crime
  • Local policy
  • Malt liquor
  • Single sales

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