Efficacy of the ASAP Intervention for Preschoolers with ASD: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

Brian A. Boyd, Linda R. Watson, Stephanie S. Reszka, John Sideris, Michael Alessandri, Grace T. Baranek, Elizabeth R. Crais, Amy Donaldson, Anibal Gutierrez, Le Anne Johnson, Katie Belardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The advancing social-communication and play (ASAP) intervention was designed as a classroom-based intervention, in which the educational teams serving preschool-aged children with autism spectrum disorder are trained to implement the intervention in order to improve these children’s social-communication and play skills. In this 4-year, multi-site efficacy trial, classrooms were randomly assigned to ASAP or a business-as-usual control condition. A total of 78 classrooms, including 161 children, enrolled in this study. No significant group differences were found for the primary outcomes of children’s social-communication and play. However, children in the ASAP group showed increased classroom engagement. Additionally, participation in ASAP seemed to have a protective effect for one indicator of teacher burnout. Implications for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3144-3162
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding The research reported here was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), US Department of Education through Grant R324A110256 awarded to UNC-Chapel Hill.

Funding Information:
The research reported here was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), US Department of Education through Grant R324A110256 awarded to UNC-Chapel Hill. The opinions expressed represent those of the authors and do not represent views of the Institute or the US Department of Education. Because this was an IES-funded grant, the ASAP randomized controlled trial was registered with the What Works Clearinghouse?s Registry of Randomized Controlled Trials (Study ID: 342; registered on 10/19/2015 https://www.sree.org/pages/registry.php). In addition, we wish to thank all of the coaches and research staff who assisted with this project as well as the school personnel who participated in this study and the parents who agreed for their children to participate. Drs. Boyd, Watson, Crais and Baranek are developers of the ASAP manuals and accompanying intervention and training materials, but receive no royalties. Dr. Boyd receives royalties for a book published through the Springer International Publishing company. Drs. Alessandri, Belardi, Donaldson, Gutierrez, Johnson, Reszka and Sideris declare that they have no conflict of interest to disclose.

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments The research reported here was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), US Department of Education through Grant R324A110256 awarded to UNC-Chapel Hill. The opinions expressed represent those of the authors and do not represent views of the Institute or the US Department of Education. Because this was an IES-funded grant, the ASAP randomized controlled trial was registered with the What Works Clearinghouse’s Registry of Randomized Controlled Trials (Study ID: 342; registered on 10/19/2015 https://www.sree.org/pages/registry.php). In addition, we wish to thank all of the coaches and research staff who assisted with this project as well as the school personnel who participated in this study and the parents who agreed for their children to participate. Drs. Boyd, Watson, Crais and Baranek are developers of the ASAP manuals and accompanying intervention and training materials, but receive no royalties. Dr. Boyd receives royalties for a book published through the Springer International Publishing company.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • ASAP
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Engagement
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • School interventions
  • Social-communication

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