Endometrial stromal cells in culture: An attempt to understand the genesis and biologic activity of uterine sarcomas

Leslie A. Walton, Jill M. Siegfried, Karen G. Nelson, Gene Siegal, David G. Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The genesis of uterine sarcomas in vivo has been difficult to elucidate. The reasons are multifactorial and are compounded by the rarity of these tumors. In an effort to understand the biologic activity of this disease, normal endometrial tissue was subjected to tissue culture, histochemical study, and hormonal manipulation. Protein markers were used to differentiate endometrial epithelium from endometrial stromal cells in culture. The endometrial stromal cells grew rapidly following subculturing and were responsive to hormonal manipulation. When the stromal cells in culture were treated with the carcinogen N-methylN′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), the resultant morphologic changes mimicked uterine sarcomas grown in culture. These changes appeared to occur in a sequential manner, somewhat analogous to changes occurring in the endometrial epithelium as it undergoes transformation to endometrial adenocarcinoma. These studies, therefore, may serve as a model system in understanding the genesis and biologic activity of uterine sarcomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-257
Number of pages11
JournalGynecologic oncology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1986

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
’ This work was supported by Contract NOI-CP75 956 and Grant ROI-CA31733 from the National Cancer Institute. ’ To whom reprint requests should be addressed.

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