Enhanced ultrasound imaging resolution with 3D optical patch imagery

Wang Dan, Andrew Casper, Ahmed H. Tewfik, Emad S Ebbini

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents a method of improving 3D ultrasound image resolution by fusing the 3D ultrasound images with 3D optical imagery obtained from a limited field of view. Organ surfaces are reconstructed using fine samples from the optical image of a single side of the organ and coarse samples from ultrasound image of the hidden side. The reconstruction is based on the fact that all deformations of an organ surface lie in low dimensional structured subspaces that can be learned using training data obtained from different subjects. The multimodality fusion algorithm accounts for differences in resolution and noise levels between the different modalities. Experiment results using ex-vivo MRI, ultrasound and optical images provide the first demonstration of improving ultrasound image resolution by an average of 2.6 mm using optical images. Surface details not seen on the ultrasound image are clearly visible on the reconstructed image. Specifically, the enhanced reconstruction achieves an average error level of less than 3 mm on the hidden organ surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 8th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Nano to Macro, ISBI'11
Pages21-24
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2011
Event2011 8th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI'11 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Mar 30 2011Apr 2 2011

Other

Other2011 8th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI'11
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period3/30/114/2/11

Keywords

  • Ultrasound
  • organ deformation
  • orthogonal subspace pursuit
  • spherical harmonics

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