Epidemiology of substance-exposed pregnancies at one great lakes hospital that serves a large number of American Indians

Jessica D. Hanson, Jamie L. Jensen, Kelly Campbell, Kaushal Raj Chaudhary, Susan E. Puumala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at a hospital in the Great Lakes region of the U.S. Method: Data were collected via retrospective chart abstractions of patients who were seen for delivery at one Great Lakes region hospital during a 1-year period who were given at least one of the International Classification of Diseases codes related to substance use. Results: A total of 342 medical records were included in the analysis, and, while much race/ethnicity data were missing, a large percentage of those in our analysis identified as American Indian. The prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at this hospital during a 1-year period was 34.5%. The majority (84.8%) were tobacco users, and many were found to have multiple substance exposures. Also, 48.5% were found to have a mental health diagnosis in addition to substance use. Conclusions: Data from this project can be used in prevention efforts, including preconception care for women at risk for substance use and mental health issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-62
Number of pages19
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project was supported by the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U54MD008164. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIMHD or the NIH. This project was also supported by Sanford Health through an internal funding mechanism. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of Sanford Health.

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