Estimation of recent and long-term malaria transmission in a population by antibody testing to multiple Plasmodium falciparum antigens

Bartholomew N. Ondigo, James S Hodges, Kathleen F. Ireland, Ng'wena G. Magak, David E. Lanar, Sheetij Dutta, David L. Narum, Gregory S. Park, Ayub V. Ofulla, Chandy C. John

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Tools that estimate recent and long-term malaria transmission in a population would be highly useful for malaria elimination programs. Methods: The prevalence of antibodies to 11 Plasmodium falciparum antigens was assessed by cytometric bead assay or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 1000 people in a highland area of Kenya over 14 months, during a period of interrupted malaria transmission. Results: Antibodies differed by antigen in acquisition with age: rapid (>80% antibody positive by age 20 years, 5 antigens), moderate (>40% positive by age 20 years, 3 antigens), or slow (<40% positive by age 20 years, 3 antigens). Antibody seroreversion rates in the 14 months between samples decreased with age rapidly (7 antigens), slowly (3 antigens), or remained high at all ages (schizont extract). Estimated antibody half-lives in individuals >10 years of age were long (40 to >80 years) for 5 antigens, moderate (5-20 years) for 3 antigens, and short (<1 year) for 3 antigens. Conclusions: Antibodies to P. falciparum antigens in malaria-endemic areas vary by age, antigen, and time since last exposure to P. falciparum. Multiplex P. falciparum antibody testing could provide estimates of long-term and recent malaria transmission and potentially of a population's susceptibility to future clinical malaria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1123-1132
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume210
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Keywords

  • Antibody
  • Elimination
  • Half-life
  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium falciparum

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