Ethical and legal implications of the risks of medical tourism for patients: A qualitative study of Canadian health and safety representatives' perspectives

Valorie A. Crooks, Leigh Turner, I. Glenn Cohen, Janet Bristeir, Jeremy Snyder, Victoria Casey, Rebecca Whitmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Medical tourism involves patients' intentional travel to privately obtain medical care in another country. Empirical evidence regarding health and safety risks facing medical tourists is limited. Consideration of this issue is dominated by speculation and lacks meaningful input from people with specific expertise in patient health and safety. We consulted with patient health and safety experts in the Canadian province of British Columbia to explore their views concerning risks that medical tourists may be exposed to. Herein, we report on the findings, linking them to existing ethical and legal issues associated with medical tourism. Design: We held a focus group in September 2011 in Vancouver, British Columbia with professionals representing different domains of patient health and safety expertise. The focus group was transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Participants: Seven professionals representing the domains of tissue banking, blood safety, health records, organ transplantation, dental care, clinical ethics and infection control participated. Results: Five dominant health and safety risks for outbound medical tourists were identified by participants: (1) complications; (2) specific concerns regarding organ transplantation; (3) transmission of antibiotic-resistant organisms; (4) (dis)continuity of medical documentation and (5) (un)informed decision-making. Conclusions: Concern was expressed that medical tourism might have unintended and undesired effects upon patients' home healthcare systems. The individual choices of medical tourists could have significant public consequences if healthcare facilities in their home countries must expend resources treating postoperative complications. Participants also expressed concern that medical tourists returning home with infections, particularly antibiotic-resistant infections, could place others at risk of exposure to infections that are refractory to standard treatment regimens and thereby pose significant public health risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number002302
JournalBMJ open
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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