European-American and African-American mothers' emotion socialization practices relate differently to their children's academic and social-emotional competence

Jackie A. Nelson, Esther M. Leerkes, Nicole B. Perry, Marion O'Brien, Susan D. Calkins, Stuart Marcovitch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study examines whether the relation between mothers' responses to their children's negative emotions and teachers' reports of children's academic performance and social-emotional competence are similar or different for European-American and African-American families. Two hundred mothers (137 European-American, 63 African-American) reported on their responses to their five-year-old children's negative emotions and 150 kindergarten teachers reported on these children's current academic standing and skillfulness with peers. Problem-focused responses to children's negative emotions, which have traditionally been considered a supportive response, were positively associated with children's school competence for European-American children, but expressive encouragement, another response considered supportive, was negatively associated with children's competence for African-American children. The findings highlight the need to examine parental socialization practices from a culturally specific lens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-498
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Development
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Academic performance
  • Emotion socialization
  • Ethnicity
  • Social-emotional competence

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'European-American and African-American mothers' emotion socialization practices relate differently to their children's academic and social-emotional competence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this