Evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes in hematological malignancies of dogs and humans - Man and his best friend share more than companionship

Matthew Breen, Jaime F. Modiano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The pathophysiological similarities shared by many forms of human and canine disease, combined with the sophisticated genomic resources now available for the dog, have placed 'man's best friend' in a position of high visibility as a model system for a variety of biomedical concerns, including cancer. The importance of nonrandom cytogenetic abnormalities in human leukemia and lymphoma was recognized over 40 years ago, but the mechanisms of genome reorganization remain incompletely understood. The development of molecular cytogenetics, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology, has played a significant role in our understanding of cancer biology by providing a means for 'interrogating' tumor cells for a variety of gross genetic changes in the form of either numerical or structural chromosome aberrations. Here, we have identified cytogenetic abnormalities in naturally occurring canine hematopoietic tumors that are evolutionarily conserved compared with those that are considered characteristic of the corresponding human condition. These data suggest that humans and dogs share an ancestrally retained pathogenetic basis for cancer and that cytogenetic evaluation of canine tumors may provide greater insight into the biology of tumorigenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-154
Number of pages10
JournalChromosome Research
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported in part by grants 1626 (J.M.) 2214 (M.B.) and 2254 (M.B., J.M.), from the AKC Canine Health Foundation and grant RSG-02-173-01-LIB from the American Cancer Society. We thank Drs Ted Valli and David Getzy for histopathology support and Susan Fosmire for technical support.

Keywords

  • Chromosome
  • Comparative
  • Dog
  • Evolution
  • Leukemia
  • Lymphoma

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes in hematological malignancies of dogs and humans - Man and his best friend share more than companionship'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this