Examining gender salary disparities: an analysis of the 2003 multistate salary survey

Lawrence M. Brown, Jon C. Schommer, Dave Mott, Caroline A. Gaither, William R. Doucette, Dave P. Zgarrick, Marcus Droege

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Pharmacist salary and wage surveys have been conducted at the state and national level for more than 20 years; however, it is not known to what extent, if any, wage disparities due to gender still exist. Objectives: The overall objective of this study was to determine if wage disparities exist among male and female pharmacists at the multistate and individual state level for each of 6 states studied. A secondary objective was to explore the effect of various demographic variables on the hourly wages of pharmacists. Methods: Data were collected from 1,688 pharmacists in 6 states during 2003 using a cross-sectional descriptive survey design. A multiple regression analysis on hourly wage testing the effects of state of practice, practice setting, position, terminal degree, and years in practice was conducted. Subsequent multiple regression analyses were conducted individually for each of the 6 states to test the effects of the above variables on hourly wage for both male and female pharmacists, followed by state-level analyses for male and female pharmacists, respectively. Results: For the pooled data, all variables were found to be significant predictors of hourly wage, except for earning a PharmD degree without a residency or graduate degree. Gender was not a significant predictor of wage disparities in the state-level analyses. Position was the only significant predictor of wage disparities in all states (except Tennessee) such that pharmacists in management positions make significantly higher salaries than those in staff positions. Conclusions: The results of these analyses suggest that wage disparities due to gender do not exist at the state level for the 6 states surveyed, when controlling for practice setting, position, terminal degree, and years in practice. The larger number of men in management positions may explain lower wages for female pharmacists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)370-387
Number of pages18
JournalResearch in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

Keywords

  • Female pharmacists
  • Gender issues
  • Pharmacists
  • Pharmacy
  • Salary
  • Salary disparities
  • Salary survey

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