Examining the Validity of Low-Income African American Women's Responses to Items from the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI)

Deanna L. Carpenter, M. H. Miner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The CSBI assesses problems associated with compulsive sexual behavior in male samples. Three hundred and six low income women were administered a 13-item CSBI prior to a sexual health seminar. CFA was used to confirm the previously-established two factor model. The two factor model showed acceptable fit. Women's scores appeared lower than men's. CSBI-13 total and subscale scores were higher in women who reported having engaged in sex exchange. Results support continued use of CSBI Total and Control scores in studying women's sexual behavior. It is unclear whether women's lower scores indicate less CSB or whether women's symptoms are inadequately measured by the CSBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-198
Number of pages18
JournalSexual Addiction and Compulsivity
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The project analyzed existing de-identified data provided by participants in Women’s Initiative for Sexual Health (WISH) seminars (Robinson, Uhl, Miner, Bockting, Scheltema, Rosser, & Westover, 2002b). These seminars are intensive 2-day sexual health programs that evolved from a collaboration between the Program in Human Sexuality (Department of Family Practice and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School) and three community-based organizations serving the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area African American community (Robinson et al., 2002b). The seminar integrates HIV and STI-prevention approaches into a comprehensive sexuality education curriculum. The WISH project was funded by the Minnesota Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the protocol for the use of human subjects in this research was reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Boards of the University of Minnesota and the CDC (Robinson, Bockting & Harrell, 2002a).

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Examining the Validity of Low-Income African American Women's Responses to Items from the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this