Explaining the Relationships among Supportive Message Quality, Evaluations, and Outcomes: A Dual-Process Approach

Graham D. Bodie, Brant R. Burleson, Susanne M. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research on supportive communication has been concerned with two primary classes of dependent variables. Message evaluations refer to judgments about the supportive message and/or the sender of that message, and message outcomes refer to cognitive, affective, and behavioral effects of messages. Most studies have utilized variables from one or the other class with less attention paid to the association between evaluations and outcomes. Indeed, there is a common assumption that message evaluations are a valid proxy for other outcomes of interest. This assumption is tested empirically in this article. Results from two studies show that (1) evaluations of messages mediate the effect of message quality on outcomes and (2) degree of message scrutiny moderates this mediating effect by altering the degree to which message quality influences evaluations. We use a dual-process theory of supportive message outcomes as the framework for interpreting supportive message effects and for examining the link between message evaluations and outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Keywords

  • Comforting Messages
  • Dual-Process Theory
  • Emotional Support
  • Social Support

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Explaining the Relationships among Supportive Message Quality, Evaluations, and Outcomes: A Dual-Process Approach'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this