Failure to demonstrate transmission of enzootic bovine leukemia virus infection from cows to sheep by use of common injection needles.

A. F. Weber, J. C. Meiske, D. L. Haggard, D. K. Sorensen, A. M. Domagala, A. M. Flaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Four bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-seropositive and 2 BLV-seronegative cows were used as donors in a study to provide evidence whether IM injection with common needles is a means of spreading bovine leukemia. Sheep were used as recipients. Of the 4 BLV-seropositive cows, 2 had high virus expression (VE; 43% and 28% of their lymphocyte thin sections had associated BLV-particles), whereas the other 2 cows did not have observed VE. After each of the 4 cows was given an injection of a 5-antigen Leptospira bacterin, a BLV-seronegative sheep was immediately given an injection of the same bacterin with the same needle. None of these sheep seroconverted, nor did either of 2 sheep given only the bacterin (with a previously unused needle). Sheep inoculated IM with 0.2 ml of whole blood from both of the cows with high VE and from 1 of the 2 BLV-seropositive cows that did not have observed VE did seroconvert. In contrast, the sheep inoculated with 0.2 ml of blood from the remaining BLV-seropositive (0% VE) cow and from the 2 BLV-seronegative cows remained seronegative. These results were interpreted to indicate that the quantity of infective lymphocytes passed during injection with common needles is too small to induce infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1814-1816
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume49
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1988

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