False recollection induced by photographs: A comparison of older and younger adults

Daniel L. Schacter, Wilma Koutstaal, Mara S. Gross, Marcia K. Johnson, Kathryn E. Angell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

145 Scopus citations

Abstract

Looking at photographs constitutes an important everyday memory activity for older adults. The authors found that reviewing photographs of events seen earlier in a videotape increases the likelihood that both older and younger adults remember specific details from the reviewed event (W. Koutstaal, D. L. Schacter, M. K. Johnson, K. E. Angell, and M. S. Gross, 1997). In the present study, the authors report 2 experiments demonstrating that photo review can also produce false recollection in elderly adults: After reviewing photos of events that had not been shown earlier in a videotape, older but not younger adults were later more likely to 'remember' that those events had been shown in the videotape. False recollection induced by photo review appears to reflect an age-related deficit in source-monitoring abilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-215
Number of pages13
JournalPsychology and aging
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'False recollection induced by photographs: A comparison of older and younger adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this