Family Shelter Entry and Re-entry During the Recession in Hennepin County: The Role of Race, Residential Location, and Family Earnings

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Abstract

This article examines the extent to which shelter entry and re-entry increased during the Great Recession (December 2007–December 2009) in Hennepin County, Minnesota. Among successive cohorts of families entering the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), Black families were 23% more likely to enter shelter if they were in the 2008–2009 cohort and 28% more likely to enter shelter if they were in the 2010 cohort than if they entered SNAP in 2004–2005. In addition, families who left shelter in 2009 were 39% more likely and families leaving shelter in 2010 were 63% more likely to re-enter shelter than those leaving shelter in 2004–2006. Only a small part of the increases in shelter entry and shelter re-entry was explained by reductions in family earnings. This suggests that the increases in shelter entry and re-entry may have been caused by other factors, such as the decline in the availability of affordable housing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-345
Number of pages12
JournalHousing Policy Debate
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016

Keywords

  • Homeless
  • affordability
  • foreclosure
  • labor market
  • minorities
  • neighborhood

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