Fat mass modifies the association of fat-free mass with symptom-limited treadmill duration in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

Na Zhu, David R. Jacobs, Stephen Sidney, Barbara Sternfeld, Mercedes Carnethon, Cora E. Lewis, Christina M. Shay, Akshay Sood, Claude Bouchard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The assessment of fat mass and fat-free mass in relation to the symptom-limited maximal exercise duration (Max dur) of a treadmill test allows for insight into the association of body composition with treadmill performance potential. Objective: We investigated the complex associations between fat mass and fat-free mass and Max dur in a population setting. Design: The Max dur of a graded exercise treadmill test and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were estimated in 2413 black and white men and women aged 38-50 y from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) cohort. Results: The mean Max dur was ≈7.5 s shorter per kilogram of fat mass in both men and women and independent of fat-free mass, height, race, television watching, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, lung function, and education. Fat mass modified the association of fat-free mass with the Max dur (2-way interaction P < 0.001), and the interaction was stronger in women than in men. In men in the lowest fat-mass quartile, the Max dur was 1.3 s longer per kilogram of fat-free mass and was 0.5 s shorter per kilogram of fat-free mass in the highest fat-mass quartile. In contrast, in women with the least fat mass, the Max dur was 2.7 s longer per kilogram of fat-free mass and was 2.8 s shorter per kilogram of fat-free mass in the highest fat-mass quartile. Conclusions: The Max dur was negatively related to fat mass. Fat-free mass in obese people contributed little to the treadmill performance potential as assessed by the Max dur, although the contribution of fat-free mass was positive in thinner people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-391
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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