Feel American, Watch American, Eat American? Remote Acculturation, TV, and Nutrition Among Adolescent–Mother Dyads in Jamaica

Gail M. Ferguson, Henna Muzaffar, Maria I. Iturbide, Hui Chu, Julie Meeks Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Globalization prompts remote acculturation toward U.S. culture in Jamaica; this study used a bioecological systems approach to examine its proximal impact on nutrition through U.S. cable TV consumption, and maternal influences in the home. Overall, 330 randomly selected adolescent–mother dyads from schools in Kingston, Jamaica (Madolescent_age = 13.8 years, SDadolescent_age = 1.8) completed questionnaires reporting American identity and behavioral preferences, daily time spent watching U.S.-produced TV programs, and frequency of eating unhealthy foods. Actor–partner interdependence models revealed that girls’ American identity/behavior directly predicted their unhealthy eating, whereas girls’ mothers and boys’ American identity/behavior indirectly predicted unhealthy eating as mediated by their U.S. TV hours. Additionally, mothers’ American identity/behavior predicted daughters’ unhealthy eating as mediated by mothers’ U.S. TV hours. Remote acculturation theory may facilitate more targeted research and prevention/intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1360-1377
Number of pages18
JournalChild development
Volume89
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

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