Fine-needle aspiration of cutaneous, subcutaneous, and intracavitary masses in dogs and cats using 22- vs 25-gauge needles

Shiori Arai, Paul Rist, Noel Clancey, Cornelia Gilroy, Henrik Stryhn, Pierre Amsellem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a common procedure as a diagnostic tool in veterinary medicine. However, it is unclear whether the gauge of the needle affects the quality of cytology. Objective: This study compared the quality of cytologic samples obtained via FNA using 22- or 25-gauge needles. Methods: Fine-needle aspiration was performed on 50 masses (cutaneous, subcutaneous, or intracavitary) obtained from client-owned animals. The size of the needle was randomly assigned using either of the following two sequences: 22-25-22 gauge or 25-22-25 gauge. Samples were evaluated by two board-certified clinical pathologists to assess cellularity, blood contamination, amount of cellular debris, degree of cellular trauma, and the overall ability to make a diagnosis for each sample. Results: No significant difference was detected between the 22- and 25-gauge needle samples for cellularity, whereas a significant difference was present for blood contamination, amount of cellular debris, and degree of cellular trauma. The overall ability to make a diagnosis was not significantly affected by the needle gauge. The degree of cellular trauma was significantly increased in intracavitary samples. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Needle gauge is a contributing factor to FNA sample quality. However, it did not affect the overall ability to make a diagnosis. Samples obtained using 25-gauge needles resulted in less blood contamination yet increased cellular trauma compared to 22-gauge needle samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-292
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Clinical Pathology
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by Companion Animal Trust Fund from the Atlantic

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology

Keywords

  • cats
  • cytology
  • dogs
  • needles
  • tumors

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