Fruit and Vegetable Intake Correlates During the Transition to Young Adulthood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

76 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: During the transition from adolescence to young adulthood, the intake of fruit and vegetables tends to decline, and national survey data indicate that few young adults consume the recommended amounts. This study aimed to identify longitudinal correlates of follow-up fruit and vegetable intake in early young adulthood. Methods: Surveys and food frequency questionnaires were completed by 1495 adolescent participants in high school classrooms at baseline (in 1998-1999; mean age=15.9 years, SD=0.8) and by mail at follow-up (in 2003-2004; mean age=20.4 years, SD=0.8). In 2007, linear regression methods were used to identify baseline factors associated with follow-up fruit and vegetable intake. Results: Baseline taste preferences, perceived benefits of healthy eating, fast-food intake, time spent watching television, family-meal frequency, and home food availability were correlates of both fruit and vegetable intake during young adulthood across gender. After adjusting for baseline intake, the only correlate of both fruit and vegetable intake during young adulthood across gender was taste preferences. Conclusions: The findings suggest that nutrition interventions for adolescents should provide opportunities for them to taste more fruit and vegetables, and should address supports for healthy eating both within and outside the home environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-37.e3
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data collection was supported by grant #R40 MC 00319 from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (Title V, Social Security Act), Health Resources and Service Administration, USDHHS. Analyses were supported by the Adolescent Health Protection Program, grant T01-DP000112 from the CDC, USDHHS. The content of the manuscript is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the CDC.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fruit and Vegetable Intake Correlates During the Transition to Young Adulthood'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this