Gender Differences in Perceived Happiness and Well-Being of Individuals Who Engage in Contemptuous Communication

John P. Crowley, Jacquelyn Harvey Knowles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigated whether the relationship between contempt and mental health outcomes differed by gender. Participants (N = 214) completed measures of happiness, general well-being, and contempt expression. The findings indicate a contrast in mental health outcomes associated with contempt expression for males and females. Specifically, males who expressed high levels of contempt reported higher levels of happiness and general well-being than males who expressed low levels of contempt; whereas, females who expressed high levels of contempt reported lower levels of happiness than females who expressed low levels of contempt. Implications for theory and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-38
Number of pages12
JournalCommunication Reports
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Contempt Expression
  • Gender Differences
  • Mental Health
  • Negative Emotion

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