Genetic signature of histiocytic sarcoma revealed by a sleeping beauty transposon genetic screen in mice

Raha A. Been, Michael A. Linden, Courtney J. Hager, Krista J. DeCoursin, Juan E. Abrahante, Sean R. Landman, Michael Steinbach, Aaron L. Sarver, David A. Largaespada, Timothy K. Starr

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare, aggressive neoplasm that responds poorly to therapy. Histiocytic sarcoma is thought to arise from macrophage precursor cells via genetic changes that are largely undefined. To improve our understanding of the etiology of histiocytic sarcoma we conducted a forward genetic screen in mice using the Sleeping Beauty transposon as a mutagen to identify genetic drivers of histiocytic sarcoma. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis was targeted to myeloid lineage cells using the Lysozyme2 promoter. Mice with activated Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis had significantly shortened lifespan and the majority of these mice developed tumors resembling human histiocytic sarcoma. Analysis of transposon insertions identified 27 common insertion sites containing 28 candidate cancer genes. Several of these genes are known drivers of hematological neoplasms, like Raf1, Fli1, and Mitf, while others are well-known cancer genes, including Nf1, Myc, Jak2, and Pten. Importantly, several new potential drivers of histiocytic sarcoma were identified and could serve as targets for therapy for histiocytic sarcoma patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere97280
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 14 2014

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