Genetic variants at the PDZ-interacting domain of the scavenger receptor class B type I interact with diet to influence the risk of metabolic syndrome in obese men and women

Mireia Junyent, Donna K. Arnett, Michael Y. Tsai, Edmond K. Kabagambe, Robert J. Straka, Michael Province, Ping An, Chao Qiang Lai, Laurence D. Parnell, Jian Shen, Yu Chi Lee, Ingrid Borecki, Jose M. Ordovás

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The scaffolding protein PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) regulates the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B type I. However, the effect of PDZK1 genetic variants on lipids and metabolic syndrome (MetS) traits remains unknown. This study evaluated the association of 3 PDZK1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) (i33968C > T, i15371G > A, and i19738C > T) with lipids and risk of MetS and their potential interactions with diet. PDZK1 SNP were genotyped in 1000 participants (481 men, 519 women) included in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study. Lipoprotein subfractions were measured by proton NMR spectroscopy and dietary intake was estimated using a validated questionnaire. The PDZK1-133968C > T polymorphism was associated with MetS (P = 0.034), mainly driven by the association of the minorT allele with higher plasma triglycerides (P = 0.004) and VLDL (P = 0.021), and lower adiponectin concentrations (P = 0.022) than in participants homozygous for the major allele (C). We found a significant gene × BMI × diet interaction, in which the deleterious association of the 133968T allele with MetS was observed in obese participants with high PUFA and carbohydrate (P-values ranging from 0.004 to 0.020) intakes. Conversely, a there was a protective effect in nonobese participants with high PUFA intake (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that PDZK1-133968C > T genetic variants may be associated with a higher risk of exhibiting MetS. This gene × BMI × diet interaction offers the potential to identify dietary and other lifestyle changes that may obviate the onset of MetS in individuals with a specific genetic background.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)842-848
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume139
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

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