Geographic Specificity Matters: Centering the Perspectives of Community-Based Stakeholders for a Holistic Understanding of Gentrification in the Twin Cities

Brittany Lewis, Molly Calhoun, Edward G. Goetz, Anthony Damiano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper highlights the qualitative component of a larger mixed methodological study that explores how community stakeholders, most impacted by gentrification pressures in the Twin Cities, understand neighborhood change as it impacts their daily lives. The purpose is to expand the current theorization of gentrification through examining the lived experiences of those most impacted. We illuminate where community stakeholders' experiences align with and diverge from the common narrative themes often cited in contemporary gentrification literature such as demographic change and physical displacement. Although common narrative frames emerged, narrative distinctions also materialized. This differentiation highlights how gentrification pressures not only influence the redevelopment of physical space, but also culture and belonging in ways that can be distinctly different even in neighborhoods of close proximity. The implications suggest the importance of geographic specificity in policy and program approaches based on distinct histories of neighborhoods and their residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)890-911
Number of pages22
JournalCity and Community
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 American Sociological Association

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