Gout prevalence in the Hmong: A prime example of health disparity and the role of community-based genetic research

Youssef M. Roman, Kajua Lor, Txia Xiong, Kathleen Culhane-Pera, Robert J. Straka

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Individuals of distinct Asian backgrounds are commonly aggregated as Asian, which could mask the differences in the etiology and prevalence of health conditions in the different Asian subgroups. The Hmong are a growing Asian subgroup in the United States with a higher prevalence of gout and gout-related comorbidities than non-Hmong. Genetic explorations in the Hmong suggest a higher prevalence of genetic polymorphisms associated with an increased risk of hyperuricemia and gout. History of immigration, acculturation, lifestyle factors, including dietary and social behavioral patterns, and the use of traditional medicines in the Hmong community may also increase the risk of developing gout and lead to poor gout management outcomes. Engaging minorities such as the Hmong population in biomedical research is a needed step to reduce the burden of health disparities within their respective communities, increase diversity in genomic studies, and accelerate the adoption of precision medicine to clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-327
Number of pages17
JournalPersonalized Medicine
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Future Medicine Ltd

Keywords

  • Asian subgroups
  • community-based genetic research
  • community-based participatory research
  • ethnicity
  • genetics
  • gout
  • health disparities
  • Hmong
  • hyperuricemia
  • racial minorities

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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