Granulomatosis with polyangiitis in a patient with biopsy-proven IgG4-related pulmonary disease and coincident small cell lung cancer

Khurram Abbass, Hollis Krug

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) was diagnosed in a patient with a 16-month history of IgG4-related lung disease that spontaneously became asymptomatic. Cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) was positive at the time of diagnosis of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), but there was no vasculitis or kidney disease. Sixteen months later he developed rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis that responded to cyclophosphamide treatment. While undergoing treatment for GPA, he was found to have a lung mass identified as small cell lung cancer. This mass was present at the time of the IgG4-RD diagnosis. GPA can be confused with IgG4-RD histologically and they rarely coexist. ANCA antibodies are primarily IgG4 subclass. IgG4-RD has been associated with cancer and may improve prognosis. We speculate that this patient may have had small cell lung cancer that incited an IgG4 predominant immune response with coexistent ANCA antibodies that eventually resulted in GPA. Immunosuppressive treatment of GPA likely accelerated the progression of the lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere226280
JournalBMJ case reports
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
this work was supported by the United states Department of Veterans

Publisher Copyright:
© BMJ Publishing Group Limited 2019.

Copyright:
Copyright 2019 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • immunology
  • lung cancer (oncology)
  • malignant disease and immunosuppression
  • pathology
  • vasculitis

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Case Reports

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