Helping maltreated children to find their Ibasho: Japanese perspectives on supporting the well-being of children in state care

Sachiko Bamba, Wendy L. Haight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes the perspectives of Japanese child welfare professionals, educators, and children living in state care on how to support the well-being of maltreated children. It focuses on a Japanese indigenous concept, Ibasho. Ibasho is a Japanese term that originally means "whereabouts" and connotes a place where a person feels acceptance, security, belonging, and/or coziness. In this study, most children with maltreatment histories described characteristics of Ibasho at their child care institutions, school, or both. Adults emphasized the importance of maltreated children's acquisition of Ibasho. They believed that part of their role involved creating an accepting atmosphere to support maltreated children in finding their Ibasho. Adults described poor social skills, withdrawn or fearful behaviors, aggressive behaviors, and superficial interpersonal relationships as impediments to Ibasho creation in some maltreated children. They attempted to support children's Ibasho creation by developing good interpersonal relationships with the children; supporting children's positive peer relationships, academic achievement, and integration into the larger community; and fostering collaborative relations between school and child care institution. Implications for U.S. social work policies and practices are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-427
Number of pages23
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Keywords

  • Ibasho
  • Japanese
  • Maltreated children
  • State care

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